20 Things You Didn’t Know About Dr. Wenneker

Yearbook Photo of Dr. Wenneker

Yearbook Photo of Dr. Wenneker

1. She has three children, and her daughters went to an all-girls school in Pittsburgh that is similar to Marlborough called Ellis School for Girls.

2. She originally worked as a college counselor, when admittance rates for schools like Stanford University and University of California, Los Angeles were higher than they are today.

3. She was a reader for the Advanced Placement Art History exam for 29 years, and she would ever so often recognized the handwriting of one of her own students’ tests.

4.  She credits a “marvelous teacher” in high school for sparking her interest in art and art history

5. She attended Chatham College, where she double majored in Art History and Drama and then moved on to graduate school at the University of Pittsburgh

6. Her favorite movie is Laurence Olivier’s Henry V.

7. She admires the music of the Baroque Composer Johann Sebastian Bach.

8. She moved from Pittsburgh to Los Angeles in 1983 to teach at Marlborough and has taught here ever since.

9. Some of her favorite writers include Evelyn Waugh and Nancy Mitford.

10. She lived in Florence, Italy for a year in the late 1960s, and her children picked up Italian easily.

11. If she weren’t a teacher, she would be an archaeologist.

12. Her favorite work of art is a house by Frank Lloyd Wright in rural Pennsylvania called Fallingwater.

13. She was a tour guide at Fallingwater and got to live in it when she wasn’t giving tours.

14. Her pet peeve is gum chewing.

15. Her favorite part about teaching is “seeing the students.”

16. She would like to visit Tahiti.

17. She walks dogs twice a week for the Amanda Foundation, a local animal shelter in Beverly Hills.

18. She usually owns around five dogs at a time, but at the moment she only owns two.

19. Some of her dogs’ names in the past have been Ciao, Precious, Maverick, Barley, and Susie, to name a few.

20. In her long tenure at Marlborough, she has noted dramatic changes in students’ footwear styles from saddle shoes to loafers to Converse sneakers.