Anders Nyquist stresses the importance of “green” designs

ECODESIGN: Swedish architect Anders Nyquist designed the “GreenZone,” an early example of holistic design in 2000 in Umea, Sweden. The project includes a car dealership, a petrol station, and a McDonald’s restaurant, all of which are heated with a geothermal heat pump. During his weeklong visit, Nyquist made suggestions for green buildings, including installing a separating toilet, and using urine as fertilizer.

ECODESIGN: Swedish architect Anders Nyquist designed the “GreenZone,” an early example of holistic design in 2000 in Umea, Sweden. The project includes a car dealership, a petrol station, and a McDonald’s restaurant, all of which are heated with a geothermal heat pump. During his weeklong visit, Nyquist made suggestions for green buildings, including installing a separating toilet, and using urine as fertilizer.

Swedish architect Anders Nyquist cannot stress enough the motto he lives by: “reduce, reuse, recycle, renewables, and rethink.”

An architect since 1962, Nyquist has implemented EcoCycle Design, imitating nature when building sustainable societies, he said. Nyquist, who was invited by Dianne Fletcher-Hoppe visited school from Nov. 26. He taught Global Studies and AP Environmental Science, met with faculty, parents, and the environmental committee, and spoke at all-school assembly.

Nyquist said that while most people talk about carbon dioxide and global warming, the more important challenge we face is developing environmentally sustainable buildings to house the increasing global population.

“I’m teaching the students how to deal with these problems by showing good examples,” Nyquist said.

Those examples include using design innovations, such as “termite ventilation,” a system that pipes air underground to naturally cool a building.
Nyquist stressed that future generations need to work on communication, energy, waste handling, and fresh water. He works on following a circular rather than linear way of thinking of production, consumption, and waste.

Global Studies instructor Martha Schuur said Nyquist’s visit was a kickoff to the annual eighth grade “country project.” This year, students will design new cities for their assigned developing countries. Nyquist also gave the school suggestions on becoming more “green,” such as building solar box cookers.

“We’re going to take them seriously and focus on what’s feasible and achievable,” Middle School Director and Chair of the Campus Environment Committee Robert Bryan said.